What can be safely put on a bonfire?

What can be safely put on a bonfire?

Guy Fawkes night is nearly upon us and as thoughts turn to toffee apples and dazzling firework displays, you might also be gathering things together to create a spectacular bonfire. But what can be safely burned on a bonfire and what should be avoided?

Items that are suitable to burn on a bonfire include:

  • Dry, untreated wood
  • Dry, non-green garden waste like prunings and brambles
  • Cardboard and paper

Remember, it is a criminal offence to get rid of domestic waste in a way that could cause pollution or harm to health. Burning plastic, rubber and painted materials release toxic smoke. Other items that shouldn’t be burned on a bonfire include:

  • Wet or treated wood
  • Flammable liquids like paraffin or petrol
  • Fireworks
  • Aerosols or paint tins
  • Foam-filled furniture
  • Metal, including nails or staples that may be found in wood
  • Batteries
  • Glass
  • Mattresses
  • General household rubbish

If you’ve got a lot of items to dispose of that aren’t suitable to burn on a bonfire, consider hiring a skip to get rid of these unwanted items. It’s more environmentally friendly too. But if you do decide on creating a bonfire, there’s important safety advice to bear in mind. Although bonfires are legal, they must be conducted in a responsible and considerate way. This includes:

  • Informing your neighbours
  • Only burning dry material so there is less smoke
  • Building the bonfire safely away from fences and trees
  • Ensuring there are no cables above the bonfire
  • Keeping children and pets well away
  • Making sure smoke will not blow across nearby roads
  • Keeping a bucket of water or a garden house nearby, just in case

The UK Fire Service has more top tips on bonfire safety.

Rabbit is committed to reducing waste and supporting recycling efforts. Contact Rabbit today for more information skip hire, recycling and plant hire. Reach us on 01903 762020 or email info@rabbitgroup.co.uk.

This entry was posted on Thursday, November 1st, 2018 at 8:00 am and is filed under Litter, News, Recycling. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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